Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘art’

10 MAY, 2011

Justin Gignac on Idea Envy and Embracing Imperfection

By:

What the garbage of New York City has to do with monetizing the starving artist archetype.

We’re longtime fans of artist Justin Gignac. (It’s jee-nak, if you just mentally tongue-twisted there.) In this wonderful, albeit tech-glitch-ridden, talk from this year’s PSFK Conference, he reveals the creative process behind some of most acclaimed projects, including Wants for Sale, NYC Garbage and QRapping paper, and shares his merit litmus test for what constitutes a great idea.

I get motivated by idea envy. I get super insanely jealous of great ideas that I see of others, I get jealous of that moment where I know they had that idea, and I want that, I want to feel that. So I set out to emulate that, and compete with that, and find that in myself.” ~ Justin Gignac

You can’t wait for perfection. You can always wait for the perfect moment, the perfect this, the perfect that. But you really just gotta start doing. And it makes all the difference. Making excuses takes the same time as making progress.” ~ Justin Gignac

Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s best articles. Here’s an example. Like? Sign up.

10 MAY, 2011

Writers’ Houses Illustrated

By:

Minimalist illustrations of iconic writers’ abodes, from Twain to Dickinson to Poe.

We have an ongoing fascination with where creators create. And while it’s somewhat easier to picture the studios of artists and designers, since there’s an aesthetic expectation aligned with their visual styles, it’s invariably a mystery to imagine where wordsmiths work their magic. That’s the subject of a collaboration between literary pilgrim A.N. Devers and design duo Michael Fusco and Emma Straub, based on the excellent Writers’ Houses site, exploring the domiciles of famous scribes through a series of stunning screenprints.

From Emily Dickinson‘s humble homestead to Mark Twain‘s whimsical micro-mansion the eerie abode of mid-century illustrator Edward Gorey, known as the Elephant House — the only monochromatic print of the bunch, perhaps a nod to Gorey’s distinctive macabre style — the two-color prints are absolutely lovely and disproportionately affordable at just $20 each, with proceeds funding the ongoing Writers’ Houses project.

For more literary voyeurism, take a peek at the excellent American Writers at Home by J. D. McClatchy and photographer Erica Lennard — a fascinating look at how physical space has shaped the work of some of today’s most beloved authors.

Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s best articles. Here’s an example. Like? Sign up.

10 MAY, 2011

Christoph Niemann: How the World Works

By:

Creative fuel for the inquisitive mind, or what trucks and lions have in common.

Christoph Niemann is our favorite children’s book illustrator and today is a big day because it’s the day he releases his latest gem: That’s How! — an absolutely lovely invitation to explore the inner workings of the world visually, through the pursuit of what we hold as our highest ideal for navigating life: Reckless, indiscriminate curiosity.

Playful, quirky and delightful, the book is a cover-to-cover treat for parents, kids and eternal children of all ages, tickling our fancy as we imagine a whimsical alternate reality behind our worn mundanity.

That’s How! is Niemann’s follow-up to a string of gems, including I LEGO NY, The Police Cloud and Subway.

Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s best articles. Here’s an example. Like? Sign up.