Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘food’

05 AUGUST, 2011

Move, Learn, Eat: Around the World in 3 Timelapse Short Films

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What an exploding volcano has to do with incredible edibles and a terabyte of globe-trotting footage.

From Rick Mereki, Tim White and Andrew Lees come three poetic and ambitious short films shot over the course of 44 days in 11 countries across 38,000 miles by way of 18 flights, exploring movement, learning and food — no better way to enter the weekend.

It’s also noteworthy that Rick doesn’t appear to have a personal site or Twitter account or any centralized online presence, and even sports a Hotmail email, yet he was able to produce some of the most creatively compelling footage I’ve come across in a long time — a lesson in not judging a proverbial book by its (digital) cover.

(That, or the whole thing is a viral hoax that will eventually turn out to be high-budget production promoting the recently rolled out Vimeo PRO. But let’s stay with the earnest, non-cynical take for now.)

via Gizmodo

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02 AUGUST, 2011

Kooky Cookery: Retro Recipes for Culinary Frankensteining

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Betty Draper’s favorite tomato aspic, or what boiled bologna has to do with marshmallows.

We’ve previously explored some fantastic quirky cookbooks and, this season, there’s a fine new addition to the omnibus: Kooky Cookery: A campy archive of irregular recipes from yester-year by Bryan Ballinger, who concocted a playful parody of and humorous archive America’s penchant for bizarre food combinations, harking back to the Golden Age of peculiar creations. (Baked-beans pizza, anyone? Great, you’ll want a side of tomato gelatin with that.) A retro-lover’s dream, the volume features a selection of odd recipes from vintage magazines and cookbooks, complete with the era’s retrotastic illustrations and analog photographs, bound to give you a good gaggle. (That’s a gag and a giggle, for the uninitiated.)

Consider Kooky Cookery for your next dinner party — for a coffeetable laugh, of course, rather than a dining table feast. Then again, who are we to judge a marshmallow fruit loaf.

via How To Be A Retronaut

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09 JUNE, 2011

La Figa: Visions of Food and Form

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Humanity’s greatest appetites together at last, or what the farmer’s market has to do with the boudoir.

Food is fundamental. It’s sustenance, it’s comunity, it’s a global economy. But for Italian artist Tiberio Simone it’s all that and much more: It’s a medium of creative expression, a sensory portal to truth, beauty and sensuality. His La Figa: Visions of Food and Form is nothing short of a feast for the senses, celebrating two of the most primal human hungers and pleasures while elevating both through the artistic lens of a true creative visionary using the human body as his canvas and food as his paintbrush. Simone’s edible masterpieces, which remained ephemeral until he collaborated with photographer Matt Freedman, spring to life from the page, extending an alluring come-hither invitation to reconnect with our own understanding of food, sexuality, and how the two feed one another.

Alongside the luscious and playful images are imaginative essays and delicious, uncommon recipes that amplify the experiential delight of Simone’s work.

‘Only those who will risk going too far can possibly know how far one can go,’ wrote T. S. Eliot. In La Figa, Tiberio and Matt transport us with their provocative and mesmerizing photographs to a place where a simple fruit, combined with the basic human form, explodes our senses – from a pomegranate bikini to rolling hills of ingredientcovered hips. I, for one, will never think of seaweed or avocado in the same way. La Figa invites us to pierce through mundane living and savor the basic ingredients of life.” ~ Nassim Nassefi, M.D.

Filmmaker Dan McComb has created a handful of wonderful, artful, poetic segments on Simone and the La Figa project that bespeak the incredible passion with which Simone approaches his work.

But what makes Simone all the more interesting as a creator and someone filled with such exuberant positivity is the grim story that led him there. After a childhood of abuse and grueling work on his father’s farm, he became a prostitute, until he finally found solace in the kitchen and eventually discovered food art as his true calling and his salvation. Watch him tell his remarkable story in this excellent talk from TEDxRainier:

With over 160 lavish full-color images, 20 mouth-watering recipes and 40 essays on food, love and life, La Figa is a genuine treat for the senses and an invitation to approach something that’s been overly functionalized and commodified with a little bit more playfulness, poignancy and poetry.

Thanks, Nassim

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