Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘humor’

31 AUGUST, 2011

Al Jaffee’s Iconic MAD Fold-Ins: The Definitive Collection, 1964-2010

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Half a century of clever visual satire from pop culture to politics, or what Warhol had to do with Whitewater.

Al Jaffee’s magnificent anti-authoritarian fold-ins, gracing the inside covers of every MAD magazine since 1964, have been a longtime favorite around here. For the past half-century, Jaffeee, just as brilliant today at 90, has been poking fun at the established political order with his clever satirical cartoons that made no topic, ideology, regime, politician or pop star safe from skewering as the reader simply folds the page to align arrow A with arrow B and reveal the hidden gag image. Now, from Chronicle Books comes The MAD Fold-In Collection: 1964-2010 — the definitive treasure trove of Jaffee’s genius, a formidable four-volume set featuring 410 fold-ins reproduced at original size, each thoughtfully accompanied by a digital representation of the folded image so you wouldn’t have to actually fold your lavish book.

Sudoku (July 2007)

Second place (October 1969)

The first Super Bowl was in 1967, and it gave football a new visibility, threatening baseball's pre-eminence.

Covering up Whitewater (September 1994)

The Whitewater scandal haunted the Clinton White House for years.

On the campaign trail! (December 1968)

A nasty campaign, with Hubert Humphrey against Richard Nixon, in the midst of a nasty war.

No one (December 1990)

A Simple tribute 10 years after John Lennon's death.

The smell of dead meat (July 1995)

Another election looming another bunch of hopefuls.

Stop Art - Empty frame is big improvement (September 1965)

The art world was full of new ideas in the mid-1960s, not all of them resonating with everyone.

Essays by Pixar animator Pete Docter, New York Times cultural critic Neil Genzlinger and Pulitzer-Prize-winning cartoonist and author Jules Feiffer contextualize Jaffee’s work and the tremendous influence it has had on generations of artists, comedians and ordinary people.

Here’s Jaffee on how his iconic fold-ins began — and confirmation that creativity is combinatorial:

In 1953, TIME magazine referred to MAD as a ‘short-lived fad.’ And now, fifty-umpteenth years later, MAD is still around, and I don’t think TIME magazine is doing too well.” ~ Al Jaffeee

Explore some of Jaffee’s gems in this excellent New York Times interactive feature from 2008 — a fine teaser for the full glory you’ll find in The MAD Fold-In Collection: 1964-2010.

via @kvox > BoingBoing

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31 AUGUST, 2011

Metropopular: If Cities Could Speak

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Charming animated short film explores city stereotypes.

Last week, we explored the cerebral side of cities with 7 essential books on urbanism. Today, we turn to the lighter side with Metropopular — a charming animated short film exploring city stereotypes through an imagined dialogue between anthropomorphized metropolises. From New York’s bravado to Boston’s brashness, the film nails the not-all-that-inaccurate clichés about each city’s signature disposition with delightful comedic elegance.

For more fun with geographic generalizations, don’t miss Yank Tsvetkov brilliant maps of European stereotypes.

via @openculture

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22 AUGUST, 2011

Famous Lives in Minimalist Pictogram Flowcharts: From Darth Vader to Jesus

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From the guillotine to lightsabers, or what vintage visual language has to do with pop culture.

From Milan-based creative agency H-57 comes this brilliant series of minimalist pictogram posters for the life-and-times of famous characters, both fictional and historical, from Darth Vader to Marie Antoinette to Jesus — part Isotype, part Everything Explained Through Flowcharts, part something entirely and ingeniously its own.

Somewhere, Otto Neurath is rolling in his grave — hard to tell whether he’s laughing or crying.

via First Floor Under

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