Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘Tara Books’

23 JULY, 2012

The Great Race: An Exquisite Tale of Forest Creatures Illustrated in the Style of Indian Folk Art

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“I’m the fastest animal in the forest! And I challenge any animal to race me!”

If you read Brain Pickings regularly, you’re intimately familiar with the wonderful work of Indian indie publisher Tara Books, who for the past 17 years has been giving voice to marginalized art and literature through a commune of artists, writers, and designers collaborating on beautifully crafted books that honor the legacy and diverse styles of Indian folk art. Now comes The Great Race (public library) — an adaptation of an Indonesian folktale featuring Kanchil the trickster mouse deer, illustrated in the stunning Mata-ni-Pachedi style of ritual textile painting from the Gujarat region by artist Jagdish Chitara and written by Nathan Kumar Scott — a first-of-its-kind use of this traditional folk art in children’s storytelling.

The Great Race is the third in Scott’s Kanchil series, a follow-up to The Sacred Banana Leaf and Mangoes and Bananas, each equally exquisite in its own right and illustrated by a different Indian artist.

Images courtesy of Tara Books

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15 MAY, 2012

I Saw a Peacock with a Fiery Tail: 17th-Century British “Trick” Poetry Meets Die-Cut Indian Folk Art

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Exquisite storytelling as exquisite artifact.

Rarely do I get this excited about the release of a book, but then again rarely does “book” fail to capture the artifactual whimsy and singular storytelling genius of a printed work so completely. From the team at Tara Books, who for the past 17 years have been giving voice to marginalized art and literature through a commune of artists, writers, and designers collaborating on remarkable handmade books, comes I Saw a Peacock with a Fiery Tail (public library) — a die-cut masterpiece two years in the making, based on a 17th-century British “trick” poem and illustrated in the signature Indian folk art style of the Gond tribe by Indian artist Ramsingh Urveti, who brought us the magnificent The Night Life of Trees.

Each line of the “trick verse” builds upon the previous one, flowing into a kind of rhythmic redundancy embodied in the physical structure of the book as each repeating line is printed only once, but appears on two pages by peeking through exquisitely die-cut holes that play on the stark black-and-white illustrations. Thus, if read page by page the way one would read a traditional book, the poem sounds spellbindingly surreal — but if read through the die-cuts, a beautiful and crisp story comes together.

Not unlike Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes, a book once dubbed “unmakeable” by bookbinders, this project required a remarkable level of ingenuity to make the conceptual structure of the poem fit the physicality of the book as a storytelling artifact. Over on the Tara Books blog, Japanese-Brazilian RISD designer Jonathan Yamakami, responsible for the book design, recounts the challenges and the Eureka! moment:

From the very beginning the main challenge to me was: how do we create a book that presents both readings without actually printing the poem twice? A lot of different solutions were considered. I think [Tara Books founder] Gita Wolf was the one who hinted at the direction of die-cutting although was still open to other possibilities. Using transparent paper and printing with two colours was another suggestion, but there was an issue of cost and, more importantly, it just seemed too complex for a poem that was in itself so simple. After all, once you crack the puzzle that it holds, you can’t help but wonder how you could have missed it to begin with.

I Saw a Peacock with a Fiery Tail is unlike any book you’ve ever held in your hands and in your heart, and outcharms even the most impressive die-cut books of the past decade.

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06 APRIL, 2012

Waterlife: Exquisite Illustrations of Marine Creatures Based on Indian Folk Art

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From walls to paper, or what the eye of the octopus has to do with swans and women’s role in the arts.

I’ve been a longtime fan of independent Indian publisher Tara Books, who for the past 16 years has been giving voice to marginalized art and literature through a commune of artists, writers, and designers collaborating on remarkable handmade books, including I Like Cats, Do!, and Tara’s crown jewel, The Night Life of Trees. But now comes what’s positively the most exquisite book I’ve ever held in my hands: Waterlife by artist Rambharos Jha, who explores the marine wonderland through vibrant Mithila art, a form of folk painting from Bihar in eastern India.

'The Lobster's Secret'

'Crocodile Smile'

'Snake Festival'

Jha writes:

I was born in the culture-rich district of Darbanga, in the Mithila region. But my father moved along with all of us to Madhubani, where he started work in a government-supported art and cultural project. This project sought to breathe new life into local art traditions and also to help artists earn a living. Since women had traditionally decorated walls and courtyards, they participated in this project in large numbers…

Living as we did in Madhubani, I had a chance to look at what they were painting. I would spend hours watching them work. I had not known of this art earlier and wondered why I was drawn to it, and what purpose there could be in my being attracted to these lines and shapes? Mixing colours and ideas, the women drew pictures that took hold of my mind.

Jha eventually learned to draw himself, initially drawing on stories from Hindu mythology and eventually moving on to more secular subjects, pursuing his own creative impulse but remaining deeply inspired by tradition.

Mithila art was originally painted on the walls of houses during festival season, but in the late 1970s, it migrated from walls to paper.

The book comes in a limited edition of 3,000 hand-numbered copies and, like all handmade Tara gems, is screen-printed by local artisans in Chennai using traditional Indian dyes, whose earthy scent you can smell as you leaf through the thick, textured pages.

Waterlife was among 10 books I curated for the TED 2012 Bookstore and is, without a shadow of exaggeration, the most beautiful book I’ve ever laid eyes on. The screen does it no justice whatsoever.

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28 NOVEMBER, 2011

Do! A Minimalist Handmade Pictogram Book in the Style of Indian Tribal Art

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Beautiful visual storytelling from the Warli tradition, hand-crafted by local artisans.

From Indian author Gita Wolf and the fine folks at Tara Books, makers of beautiful handcrafted books, comes Do! — a lovely set of action pictures rendered in the elegant minimalism of Warli tribal art. Each page depicts a basic verb (“work,” “play,” “fight”), illustrated in a style that blends the white-paint-on-brown-paper technique we’ve seen in Nurturing Walls, a pictogram-driven visual language reminiscent of the ISOTYPE of the 1930s, and a word-image minimalism akin to Blexbolex’s.

Like all Tara books, his gem is silk-screened by hand in Tara Books’ fair-trade workshop in Chennai. The pages themselves emit the rich earthy smell of artisanal craft, printed on rough recycled craft paper the color of paper bags and painted in a style that mimics the lime and chalk artwork traditionally created by the women of the Maharashtra region on walls washed with cow dung, mud, and paint.

Each image in every copy of Do!, more than an educational introduction to English verbs for young readers, is thus an original print to delight the creatively voracious of all ages.

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