Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘vintage’

10 AUGUST, 2011

Illegal Drugs, Explained in LEGO: A 1970s PSA

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The architecture of addiction, or why mixed metaphors might be more harmful than marijuana.

In the 1950s and 60s, singer Anita Bryant made a name for herself as a vocal gay rights opponent. (Take that, Anita.) In the 1970s, she added illegal drugs to her roster of targets and narrated a short “documentary” on the evils of drugs titled Drugs Are Like That, in which two school-aged children discuss their knowledge of drugs whilst constructing a giant LEGO monster. Though many of its metaphors make little sense, its odd medley of campy and condescending is a head-scratcher, and a number of its arguments are scientifically questionable, the film is nonetheless visually beautiful and creatively innovative for its time. That, or at the very least an entertaining paleofuture treat for your Wednesday. (For a better metaphor using LEGOs, see my thoughts on networked knowledge and combinatorial creativity.)

Watch or download the full 16-minute version from the Prelinger Archives — it’s public domain footage, which makes it remix material of the finest kind, ahem…

via MetaFilter

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04 AUGUST, 2011

Happy Birthday, Louis Armstrong: What a Wonderful World

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Celebrating a timeless voice with a timely message.

Just last month, we commemorated 40 years since the world lost the great Louis Armstrong with Satchmo, the fascinating documentary about his life and legacy. But there’s no reason not to also celebrate his birth, which happens to have taken place exactly 110 years ago today. And there’s hardly a better way to do that than by taking delight in one of his most iconic performances, his remarkable rendition of “What a Wonderful World” — with the added joy of serving up a simple reminder of optimism, amidst a particularly difficult year framed by news of every kind of global tragedy, from environmental disaster to large-scale violence to financial and political disillusionment. Sing it, Lou.

For more on the life and work of the iconic musician, look no further than Terry Teachout’s excellent Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong.

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03 AUGUST, 2011

Paleo-Pundit: 1963 Educational Film about Lasers

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What microwave oscillators have to do with ray guns and the fundamentals of creativity.

Archival footage can be an endless source of paleofuture edutainment. We’ve previously enjoyed vintage educational documentaries on everything from the art of bookbinding to the dawn of computer music. Today, we turn to a 1963 educational film from Bell Laboratories. Titled Principles of the Optical Maser, it introduces the “optical maser” — the device that came to be known as “laser,” or Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation, the first functioning Bell prototype of which made its debut in 1960. (A laser, in most basic terms, is merely a maser that works with photons in the light spectrum.)

More than anything, delightfully dorky as the footage may be, it’s also an illuminating glimpse of incremental innovation at work — a reminder that even the most advanced technologies of our time built upon the work of those who came before, as Steven Johnson keenly argues in his excellent Where Good Ideas Come From

via Laughing Squid

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