Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘animation’

20 JANUARY, 2015

How to Merge Money and Meaning: An Animated Field Guide to Finding Fulfilling Work in the Modern World

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The six psychological pillars of a satisfying life.

“To not have entirely wasted one’s life seems to be a worthy accomplishment, if only for myself,” wrote Charles Bukowski in his magnificent letter of gratitude to the man who helped him quit a soul-sucking day job to become a full-time writer. But the quest to find one’s calling is rarely easy — few people turn their childhood dreams into reality like Jane Goodall did or awaken one day early in life with Werner Herzog’s sense of “undivided duty” to propel them forward into a lifetime of fulfilling work. After all, even Van Gogh floundered to find his purpose.

When we find ourselves at the crossroads of safe and satisfying, we don’t always have the courage to let our inner life speak, much less to listen.

This terrific short animation based on philosopher Roman Krznaric’s How to Find Fulfilling Work (public library) — which I’ve previously covered at length — offers consolation to those who “have career crises, often on a Sunday evening,” by exploring the six pillars of finding a life-path that bridges money and meaning, sacrificing neither for the other:

A lack of confidence is at heart a misunderstanding of the way the world works. It’s an internalized feudalism, which imagines that only certain people — but not oneself — have the right, preordained, to get certain things.

Dive deeper here, then revisit the quirky vintage manifesto How to Avoid Work, the wise and wonderful Parker Palmer on how to define your own success, and this omnibus of ideas on how to find your purpose and do what you love.

For more such rapidly illuminating perspectives from The School of Life, see their excellent animations on what philosophy is for and what great books do for the soul.

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15 JANUARY, 2015

Why Bees Build Perfect Hexagons

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The space-economics of honey and wax.

After half a lifetime as a schoolteacher, my grandmother retired and promptly became a beekeeper. I spent large chunks of my childhood observing these extraordinary creatures, but no part of their intricately orchestrated existence mesmerized me more than the tiny, perfect cells of their hives — rows and rows of hexagons that would make Euclid proud, each exactly like the next, filled with ancient sweet goodness. Indeed, as lyrical as bees’ role in giving Earth its colors may be, or in offering a metaphor for answering every parent’s most dreaded question, they are also mathematicians of formidable precision and masterful engineers of space-efficiency.

From my friends at TED-Ed comes this illuminating animated look at why and how bees build the mathematically meticulous hexagons of which their honeycombs are constructed.

For more fantastic TED Ed animated meditations, see how melancholy expands our capacity for creativity, how the universe was born, how big infinity really is, and the tell-tale signs of a liar.

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18 DECEMBER, 2014

At What Point Are You Actually Dead?

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The science of why you can’t resurrect a dead body but might be able to, sort of, in the future.

Despite living in a universe where, as the aphorism goes, change is the only constant, we humans have a quintessential longing for permanence. True as it may be that, as Rilke believed, befriending death helps us live more fully, the prospect of death — our own, and even more so that of loved ones — remains utterly terrifying and mostly incomprehensible beyond the most abstract understanding.

In this illuminating short film from TED Ed, writer Randall Hayes and animator Anton Bogaty trace the history of our beliefs and misbeliefs about death, the curious biological realities of it, and what future scientific advances might bring to our quest for immortality.

Complement with John Updike’s sage perspective on death and this unusual children’s book that helps kids make peace with the dark subject, then revisit Alan Watts’s assuring wisdom on why our fear of death is beside the point of life.

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In 2014, I poured thousands of hours and tons of love into bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings. But it also took some hefty practical expenses to keep things going. If you found any joy and stimulation here over the year, please consider helping me fuel the former and offset the latter by becoming a Supporting Member with a recurring monthly donation of your choosing, between a cup of tea and a good dinner.





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Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s best articles. Here’s what to expect. Like? Sign up.