Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘animation’

24 FEBRUARY, 2012

The Science of Why the Past is Different from the Future, Animated

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Measuring the universe’s disorder in order to understand the arrow of time.

I remain fascinated by time — its science, its visual representation, its subjective perception, its philosophical dimension. This wonderful short video from Minute Physics, based on Sean Carroll’s From Eternity to Here: The Quest for the Ultimate Theory of Time, explores one of the most mind-bending questions about time: what makes the past different from the future?

Every difference between the past and the future can ultimately be traced to the fact that the entropy was lower in the past and is growing — that’s the second law of thermodynamics: the universe was orderly, and is becoming more disorderly.

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22 FEBRUARY, 2012

Ira Glass on the Secret of Success in Creative Work, Animated in Kinetic Typography

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On grit, the art of storytelling, and bridging the gap between good taste and great work.

This American Life host and producer Ira Glass is among our era’s most beloved storytellers. In this wonderful short motion graphics piece, filmmaker David Shiyang Liu has captured Glass’s now-legendary interview on the art of storytelling in beautifully minimalist and elegant kinetic typography. The gist of Glass’s message for beginners — that grit is what separates mere good taste from great work, and that the only way to bridge the gap between ability and ambition is to actually do the work — is one that rings true for just about every creative discipline, and something I can certainly speak to in my own experience.

The most important possible thing you can do is do a lot of work.

Look for more of Glass’s singular lens on storytelling in The New Kings of Nonfiction, his fantastically curated anthology of essays by some of today’s finest nonfiction storytellers, the introduction to which alone is an absolute literary masterpiece.

via Coudal

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20 FEBRUARY, 2012

ABCinema: A Famous Film for Each Letter of the Alphabet, Animated in One Minute

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Dial M for movie trivia.

If you crossed the best treats for film buffs with the most creative alphabet books, you might get something like Atlanta-based motionographer Evan Seitz’s ABCinema — a 58-second motion graphics gem, mapping a minimalist representation of a famous film onto each letter of the alphabet to test your movie knowledge.

The fine folks at Buzzfeed have diligently distilled the answers:

A – Amelie
B – The Big Lebowski
C – Citizen Kane
D – Dr. No
E – Edward Scissorhands
F – Ferris Bueller’s Day Off
G – The Godfather
H – The Hobbit
I – Inception
J – Jurassic Park
K – The King’s Speech
L – Lawrence of Arabia
M – My Neighbor Totoro
N – Night of the Living Dead
O – Once Upon a Time in the West
P – Pulp Fiction
Q – The Quick and the Dead
R – Rocky
S – Star Wars
T – Titanic
U – Up
V – Vertigo
W – The Wizard Of Oz
X – X-Men: First Class
Y – Yojimbo
Z – Zodiac

Where to next? Try 25 iconic Saul Bass title sequences in 100 seconds or a brief motion graphics history of the title sequence.

HT Open Culture

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