Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘art’

08 JUNE, 2012

10 Thoughts on Education and Learning from Legendary Architect Frank Lloyd Wright

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“You have to go wholeheartedly into anything in order to achieve anything worth having.”

Frank Lloyd Wright is frequently regarded as modern history’s greatest architect, having masterminded the Guggenheim Museum, Fallingwater, and a number of other iconic structures. He was also, unbeknownst to many, a formidable graphic artist. More than a legendary creator, however, he was also a deep, broad thinker of crisp conviction and wide-spanning wisdom. Frank Lloyd Wright on Architecture, Nature, and the Human Spirit: A Collection of Quotations is lovely pocket-sized micro-tome from Pomegranate (previously), edited by Frank Lloyd Wright Archives director Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer, meticulously culling more than 200 of Wright’s most memorable quotes from his published writings and his famous Sunday morning talks, which followed the Saturday evening dinners and film screenings he held at his Taliesin studio. The quotes are divided into subjects like Nature, Work & Success, Beauty, Democracy & Individual, and Creativity, but among his keenest insights explore education and learning. Here are ten of my favorites.

True study is a form of experience. (1958)

The present education system is the trampling of the herd. (1956)

(Cue in Sir Ken Robinson on the industrialization of education.)

Cultivate the poet. The poet is the unacknowledged legislator of this universe and the sooner we knock under to that the better. Get Emerson’s essay on the American scholar and read it once a year. (1957)

Culture is developed from within and education is to be groomed from without. (1959)

(Cue in William Gibson on cultivating a personal micro-culture.)

When anyone becomes an authority, that is the end of him as far as development is concerned. (1948)

Education, of course, is always based on what was. Education shows you what has been and leaves you to make the deduction as to what may be. Education as we pursue it cannot prophesy, and does not. (1955)

An expert is a man who has stopped thinking because ‘he knows.’ (1957)

You have to go wholeheartedly into anything in order to achieve anything worth having. (1958)

There is no real development without integrity, that is — a love of truth. (1957)

(Cue in this morning’s Richard Feynman commencement address on integrity.)

And, finally, an affirmation of networked knowledge and combinatorial creativity:

Quality consists in a developed consciousness and in a capacity for complete correlation of your faculties. If you are not a correlated human being, you are fragmentary, you are awkward, you are not there in any sense with the thing that is needed to be there. (1952)

Frank Lloyd Wright on Architecture, Nature, and the Human Spirit: A Collection of Quotations is a treasure trove in its entirety, full of countless other FLW gems.

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08 JUNE, 2012

Queen Victoria’s Drawings

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An unprecedented look at the private journals of Britain’s longest-ruling monarch.

Queen Victoria may be best-known for lending her name to the historical era of social and sexual restraint, but she was also a lively intellectual, a reflective thinker, and a dedicated artist since childhood. Joining these noteworthy digitization projects are Queen Victoria’s journals, spanning the period from her childhood days to her rise to the throne, her marriage to Prince Albert, and her Golden and Diamond Jubilees. (She was the first monarch to celebrate a Diamond Jubilee — her reign of 63 years was longer than that of any other British monarch and any other female monarch in history.) The collection, digitized by Oxford University’s Bodleian Libraries and the Royal Archives, contains the surviving thirteen volumes penned in Victoria’s own hand; the remaining volumes were transcribed after Queen Victoria’s death by her youngest daughter, Princess Beatrice, on her mother’s instructions.

But perhaps most striking are the Queen’s drawings, a fine addition to these peeks inside the notebooks and sketchbooks of famous creators. From her subtle yet rich watercolors to her seemingly austere but remarkably expressive black-and-white ink sketches (with a style reminiscent of Wendy MacNaughton’s), the drawings complement her observations of daily life and capture everything from members of the Royal Family to foreign military uniforms to the people and places the Queen encountered during her travels, and even her faithful dog.

Queen Victoria's children in costume for a Twelfth Night performance: ink and watercolour sketch by Queen Victoria, Tuesday 6th January 1852

A French soldier (Garde Chasse): pen and ink sketch by Queen Victoria, Saturday 25th August 1855

Women and children of Cherbourg: pen and ink sketches with watercolor by Queen Victoria, Tuesday 18th August 1857

Poste Postillion: pen and ink sketch with wash and watercolor by Queen Victoria, Wednesday 6th September 1843

French charabanc: pen and ink sketch with wash and watercolor by Queen Victoria, Sunday 3rd September 1843

Belgian infantryman: pen and ink sketch with wash and watercolour by Queen Victoria, Friday 15th September 1843

Scottish fisherwomen: pen and ink sketch with watercolor by Queen Victoria, Saturday 3rd September 1842

Eos sitting: pen and ink sketch by Queen Victoria, Thursday 1st August 1844

Wounded soldiers at the military hospital, Chatham: pen and ink sketches with watercolor by Queen Victoria, Saturday 3rd March 1855

Princess Louise dressed as a Highlander: pen and ink sketch by Queen Victoria, Tuesday 18th December 1849

Victoria, Princess Royal and Queen Victoria in costume: pen and ink sketch with watercolor by Queen Victoria, Friday 6th June 1845

Prince Albert in Bal Costumé outfit: pen and ink sketch with watercolor by Queen Victoria, Thursday 12th May 1842

Queen Victoria in Bal Costumé outfit as Queen Philippa: pen and ink sketch with watercolor by Queen Victoria, Thursday 12th May 1842

See more of the drawings, alongside handwritten journal pages and a timeline of Queen Victoria’s life and times, on the project site.

@matthiasrascher

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07 JUNE, 2012

Ray Bradbury on Space, Education, and Our Obligation to Future Generations: A Rare 2003 Interview

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“Anything that puts a sense of the miraculous in you… Anything that makes you feel alive is good.”

After this morning’s remembrance of Ray Bradbury through 11 of his most memorable quotes, here comes a rare archival gem: On August 22, 2003, SCVTV news man Leon Worden conducted a short but wide-ranging interview with the beloved author, in which he discusses such timely subjects as future of space exploration, what’s wrong with the education system, and where technology is taking us, exploring ideas as broad and abstract as the possibility of alien life and as specific and concrete as tackling the 40,000 highway deaths that take place every year.

The interview is now available online, mashed up with images from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory — highlights below.

In commenting on the cultural impact of mainstream media, Bradbury echoes David Foster Wallace’s lament:

Maybe we can get rid of a lot of lousy TV, I hope. It can look better if we can destroy most bad TV shows and most bad movies, really making more quality movies. And maybe we’ll redo our educational system and begin to teach reading and writing again. We’re not doing it now, and until we do, we’re going to be a stupid race.

But, unlike Wallace, Bradbury doesn’t believe the medium is the problem and instead makes a case for filling it with more substantial messages:

Anything except what’s on there! I watch the Turner Broadcast night after night — the old movies are better, no matter how dumb they are, they’re better what we’re doing now… We have to have more documentaries, more histories of the various countries of the world, more films on the miracles of life under the sea… when you look at the varieties of life that are under the ocean… Anything that puts a sense of the miraculous in you, that we’re living in a very strange element in this time, and we should appreciate the fact that we’re alive. Anything that makes you feel alive is good.

When asked about our obligation is in terms of passing our legacy along to future generations, Bradbury gives an answer that nods to combinatorial creativity and the idea that “you are a mashup of what you let into your life”:

If you don’t read or write, you can’t be educated, you can’t care about anything — you’ve gotta put something in people’s heads so the metaphors bounce around and collide with each other and make new metaphors. That’s the success I’ve had of daring to put different metaphors together, mashing their heads together, saying, ‘Oh my god, I didn’t think of that — how wonderful!’

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