Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘art’

02 AUGUST, 2012

Edward Gorey Illustrates Little Red Riding Hood and Other Classic Children’s Stories

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An irreverent take on some of history’s most beloved storytelling.

After exploring classic children’s stories through the lenses of architecture and minimalist graphic design, Three Classic Children’s Stories (public library) brings the unmistakable Edward Gorey aesthetic of the irreverent fancy to Little Red Riding Hood, Jack the Giant-Killer, and Rumpelstiltskin, charmingly retold by James Donnelly. The result is a gem that lives somewhere between the best of the Brothers Grimm, early Arabian Nights illustrations, and Harry Clarke’s haunting artwork for Edgar Allan Poe, with the distinct Gorey flair.

From Little Red Riding Hood:

WHUMP and a minor cloud of dust! Something leapt into the path. Little Red Riding Hood hastily arose, and her eyes met the curious gaze of a great gray wolf.

From Jack the Giant-Killer:

Bu he took one step, and the ground fell away beneath him, and he tumbled, OOF, into Jack’s giant-trap. Jack stepped up smartly and swung his shovel: WHANG.

From Rumpelstiltskin:

Away down a hole, away Down Below,
Never sorrow over milk that’s spilt! Spin
Around, go to ground, take a baby,
leave a crown,
Just a job o’ work to Rumpelstiltskin!

Whimsical and just the right amount of hair-raising, Three Classic Children’s Stories will make you look at these timeless storytelling treasures with new eyes, eyes that glimmer with Gorey’s signature inspired idiosyncrasy.

Illustrations © The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, courtesy Pomegranate. All rights reserved.

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01 AUGUST, 2012

A Three-Movement Choral Suite Based on Carl Sagan

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“Something incredible is waiting to be known.”

What could be better than the solar system set to music in a near-perpetual homage to Bach? Little, but a three-movement choral suite inspired by Carl Sagan might be it — a magnificent mashup of Sagan’s timeless words set to harmonizing voices and an awe-inspiring montage of space exploration footage. Here’s to cosmic goosebumps, courtesy of Canadian composer and teacher Kenley Kristofferson.

If we do not destroy ourselves, then we will someday venture to the stars.

Download the mp3 here. See more of ‘s Sagan tributes, though not choral, here. Then revisit the excellent Sagan Series and dip into Sagan’s own mind.

It’s Okay To Be Smart

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31 JULY, 2012

The Art of War: The Ancient Chinese Classic Adapted for Dystopia circa 2032

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A graphic novel about heroism, corporate greed, and the convergence of Wall Street and Chinatown.

Some two thousand years ago, Chinese general Sun Tzu penned The Art of War — an ancient military treatise that went on to become one of the most timeless and revered strategy books of all time, its insights extending beyond the military and into just about every domain of tactical intelligence. In The Art of War: A Graphic Novel (public library), writer Kelly Roman and illustrator Michael DeWeese adapt the classic to a futuristic world where wars are waged on a militarized Wall Street, China is the dominant global superpower, and Sun Tzu’s ancient teachings unfold in a dystopian interplay between corporate greed and the undying human capacity for empathy.

Though exceedingly gory and lacking the edutainment value of graphic novels as serious nonfiction, The Art of War: A Graphic Novel peels away the many layers of what heroism means, what it can be and should be, to paint a portrait of a world that might be around the corner if we don’t align our corporate strategies with our cultural and human values.

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