Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘art’

02 FEBRUARY, 2011

PICKED: A Documentary About Street Artist Ben Eine

By:

We have a soft spot for street art and love the work of London’s Ben Eine, so this new microdocumentary about his work by filmmaker Abbie Brandon, following Eine as his paints two murals in East London, made us swoon.

The first mural, Pro Pro Pro, was a play on Eine’s Anti Anti Anti, painted a week earlier on the opposite wall, upon iconic graphic designer Neville Brody‘s suggestion as part of the Anti Design Festival.

The second, Calculate, is a rework of Eine’s famous Vandalism piece and was commissioned by Moniker Art Fair, where Eine exhibited the following week.

More of Eine’s exceptional work can be found in Trespass: A History Of Uncommissioned Urban Art — the must-have street art bible we featured last year.

via Reaction!

We’ve got a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. It comes out on Sundays, offers the week’s main articles, and features short-form interestingness from our PICKED series. Here’s an example. Like? Sign up.

01 FEBRUARY, 2011

Music for One Apartment and Six Drummers: “Playing” Your Abode

By:

Last year, we looked at some fantastic experimental music projects sampling sound from the environment. This week, Sampled Room has been making the rounds. So we’ve decided to spotlight what’s easily the most ambitious, elaborate and creative manifestation of this environmental percussion genre: Music for One Apartment and Six Drummers — a brilliant Swedish short film about a group of six crazy percussionists, who invade an apartment and make astounding music with simple household objects.

The film originally premiered at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival and has won over 30 international awards.

So seminal was the short film and so brilliant the concept that it inspired a feature-length film based on the sextet, 2010’s French-Swedish comedy-crime Sound of Noise, written and directed by Ola Simonsson and Johannes Stjärne Nilsson.

The title of the film is based on Italian futurist Luigi Russolo’s 1913 manifesto, The Art of Noises — a work of tremendous historical significance which, while we’re at it, we couldn’t recommend more.

Thanks, Marine

Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s best articles. Here’s an example. Like? Sign up.

31 JANUARY, 2011

Aaron Koblin on the Digital Renaissance

By:

We’re big fans of creative technology rock star Aaron Koblin, whose Sheep Market, Bicycle Built for 2,000 and Johnny Cash projects we’ve featured previously.

In this excellent interview, the fine folks of Emergence Collective track Aaron down at Sundance, where he’s working on Google’s Life in a Day crowdsourced film project, and ask him some compelling questions about computational aesthetics, the digital renaissance, and the future of creative technology:

  • Are there networked aesthetics which can be visually identified?
  • How will moving images change in the next 20–30 years?
  • What do you think about this word ‘user-generated content’?
  • Do you identify with the current artistic trend to shift away from product towards process?
  • What indicators are there of a digital renaissance?

We’re seeing what happens when you reach a point where computational resources are no longer the most significant factor in thinking, where we don’t have to bend our will to what we’re able to do. We’re really able to stop thinking about [computational resources] and bend them to our needs and our interests. It lends itself to a complete different type of a creative process, where you can really explore and experiment a lot more freely than one could before. […] Perhaps most significantly, it lets us create our own limitations, and I think those generally can be a lot more meaningful than the ones arbitrarily put on by the media.” ~ Aaron Koblin

You can find Aaron’s work in a couple of our favorite books on the convergence of computational software and creativity, FORM+CODE and Data Flow 2: Visualizing Information in Graphic Design.

HT @edwardharran

Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s best articles. Here’s an example. Like? Sign up.

31 JANUARY, 2011

Word on the Street: Found Urban Type Timed for Social Commentary

By:

For the past 30 years, photographer Richard Nagler has been capturing urbanity’s ephemeral moments of existential irony by pairing found typography from the urban landscape with perfectly timed random passersby. His original inspiration for the series came one summer in the late 1970, when he was wandering the streets of Oakland and noticed the word TIME bolted in large letters on the side of an old building. As he looked up, a very old woman gazed out at him from a window near the type sign, and in that micro-moment he founded embedded a powerful visual metaphor for aging and the passage of time.

Word on the Street is a fantastic collection of Nagler’s richest such images from the past three decades, which iconic poet Allen Ginsberg eloquently and accurately described as “visual poetics.” Sometimes shocking, often surprising and invariably compelling, these portraits invite you, with a wink, to complete the barely bespoken narratives and look for those hidden yet staggeringly obvious human truths that interlace with the fabric of mundanity.

Image courtesy of Richard Nagler

Image courtesy of Richard Nagler

Image courtesy of Richard Nagler

Image courtesy of Richard Nagler

Image courtesy of Richard Nagler

Image courtesy of Richard Nagler

Image courtesy of Richard Nagler

Thoughtful, amusing and deeply human, Word on the Street is an absolute treasure trove of meticulously timed serendipity, captured with a keen eye for poetic irony.

via NPR

Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s best articles. Here’s an example. Like? Sign up.