Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘Taschen’

15 OCTOBER, 2014

Man Meets Woman: Minimalist Pictogram Commentary on Gender Norms

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From breakups to bonuses to bathroom breaks, infographic distillation of the truths and fictions behind stereotypes.

“It’s a special kind of privilege to be born into the body you wanted, to embrace the essence of your gender even as you recognize what you are up against,” a wise young woman wrote. And yet, as Margaret Mead knew and Shonda Rhimes attested, what one is up against might often eclipse any appreciation of that privilege — especially in a culture where unconscious biases run rampant even among the best-intentioned of us.

In 2009, Chinese-born German graphic designer Yang Liu explored cultural differences in minimalist pictogram infographics. Five years later, she returns with Man meets Woman (public library) — a romp through the challenges of communication between the sexes and the cultural baggage of gender models, a contemporary caricature that reads like the modern-day, grownup version of the 1970 satirical gem I’m Glad I’m a Boy! I’m Glad I’m a Girl!

The stereotypical roles and exchanges Liu depicts are sometimes funny because they’re true, sometimes offensive because they’re true, but mostly tragic (not even tragicomic) because they’re false and limiting and toxic, and yet persist anyway — the peril of all stereotypes.

Liu writes:

We are living in an age of constant social change, in which the subject of the sexes … is rapidly evolving in people’s consciousness. Each generation re-assesses and questions the role models currently in place…

It is interesting to see how Man/Woman clichés have indeed changed in our daily lives and to what extent the attributes that were assigned to the sexes in the past, often centuries ago, are still relevant in today’s society. And to consider which desirable role models are already rooted in our thinking but are still in the process of transformation.

While the book is primarily focused on heterosexual gender norms, Liu does offer a few funny and poignant diptychs about LGBT relationships and the presence of gay and lesbian couples in pop culture:

Complement Man meets Woman with Susan Sontag on how stereotypes imprison us, a wonderful proto-feminist children’s book from 1935, and a pause-giving French short film about sexism, then revisit this excellent and urgently necessary read on our unconscious biases.

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05 SEPTEMBER, 2014

The Book of Miracles: Rare Medieval Illustrations of Magical Thinking

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A visual record of humanity’s most eternal fears and our immutable longing for grace, mercy, and the miraculous.

In 1552, a curious and lavishly illustrated manuscript titled Augsburg Book of Miraculous Signs appeared in the Swabian Imperial Free City of Augsburg, then a part of the Holy Roman Empire, located in present-day Germany. It exorcised, in remarkable detail and wildly imaginative artwork, Medieval Europe’s growing obsession with signs sent from “God” — a testament to the basic human propensity for magical thinking, with which we often explain feelings and phenomena beyond the grasp of our logic. This unusual Roman manuscript was recently discovered and published for the first time as The Book of Miracles (public library) — a sumptuous box-sized trilingual tome in English, French, and German, produced in Taschen‘s typical fashion of pleasurable aesthetic bombast. Somewhere between Salvador Dalí’s illustrations of Montaigne, the weird and wonderful Codex Seraphinianus, and the visual history of Gotham’s imaginary apocalypse, the book is a singular shrine to some of the most eternal of human hopes and fears, and, above all, our immutable longing for grace, for mercy, for the miraculous.

What makes the book particularly notable is that its vibrant artwork, while strikingly beautiful, also illustrates religion’s heavy reliance on magical thinking. The word “religion” itself originates in the Latin for “binding together,” suggesting a sense not only of creating community but also of bridging complex things we don’t understand with simple ideas we do, via storytelling — something Carl Sagan famously explored.

The manuscript also offers a record of how word-of-mouth propagates the building blocks of belief and, eventually, the belief itself — the history of miracle-sighting is essentially a history of media, as “wonders” were first transmitted via regular letter correspondence and became a news item after the surge in broadsheets and pamphlets made possible by the invention of the Gutenberg press.

Complement the formidable Book of Miracles with other Taschen masterworks of visual delight and cultural history, including the best illustrations from 150 years of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tales, the life and legacy of infographics godfather Fritz Kahn, a Victorian reimagining of Euclid’s elements, and the visual history of magic.

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29 NOVEMBER, 2013

Mondrian Meets Euclid: An Eccentric Victorian Mathematician’s Masterwork of Art and Science

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Math in primary colors and graphic design before there was graphic design.

Almost a century before Mondrian made his iconic red, yellow, and blue geometric compositions, and around the time that Edward Livingston Youmans was creating his stunning chemistry diagrams, an eccentric 19th-century civil engineer and mathematician named Oliver Byrne produced a striking series of vibrant diagrams in primary colors for a 1847 edition of the legendary Greek mathematical treatise Euclid’s Elements. Byrne, a vehement opponent of pseudoscience with an especial distaste phrenology, was early to the insight that great design and graphic elegance can powerfully aid learning. He explained that in his edition of Euclid, “coloured diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” The book, a masterpiece of Victorian printing and graphic design long before “graphic design” existed as a discipline, is celebrated as one of the most unusual and most beautiful books of the 19th century.

Now, the fine folks of Taschen — who have brought us such visual treasures as the best illustrations from 150 years of Hans Christian Andersen, the life and legacy of infographics godfather Fritz Kahn, and the visual history of magic — are resurrecting Byrne’s gem in the lavish tome The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid (public library), edited by Swiss polymath Werner Oechslin.

Proof of the Pythagorean theorem

A masterwork of art and science in equal measure, this newly rediscovered treasure mesmerizes the eye with its brightly colored circles, squares, and triangles while it tickles the brain with its mathematical magic.

Byrne’s The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid is spectacular to both behold and absorb, offering superb stimulation for both sides of the brain. (Figuratively speaking, of course, for we know that the left-brain vs. right-brain divide is a dangerous myth.) Complement it with Youmans’s gorgeous diagrams of how chemistry works.

Images courtesy of Taschen

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