Brain Pickings

Posts Tagged ‘video’

30 AUGUST, 2012

How To Run Right

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You’ve been doing it wrong — 5 do’s and don’ts.

Last month brought us the premiere of BOOKD, a new bi-weekly video series exploring “game-changing books.” After discussing the most important food politics book of the past half-century, they’ve turned their lens to Christopher McDougall’s 2011 bestseller Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen (public library), which looks at the most popular athletic activity in the world and argues that we might have been doing it wrong all along.

Here, Harvard evolutionary biology professor Daniel Lieberman offers 5 do’s and don’ts for how to run right:

  1. DON’t overstride. Don’t land with your foot in front of your knee — it makes you decelerate and lose energy and sends a shockwave of impact up your body.
  2. DO land with a flat foot. Land — gently — on the ball of your foot or with a midfoot strike, not on your heel.
  3. DO run vertically. Don’t lean forward at the hips.
  4. DON’t “thump.” If you’re making a lot of noise, you’re running poorly.
  5. DO ease into it. Listen to pain. Don’t overdo it. If you transition to run properly too fast, you’re guaranteed to injure yourself — you need to adapt your body.

Catch the full episode below, and dive deeper with the book itself.

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19 JULY, 2012

Einstein, Gödel, and the Science of Time Travel

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Meeting your future grandchildren in a rotating universe.

The fabric of time remains among the most fascinating frontiers of science, and the concept of time travel among the most prolific plot lines of science fiction. In this short video from THNKR, who also brought us the BOOKD series on paradigm-shifting books, theoretical physicist Ronald Mallett goes against the present scientific consensus and argues, by way of Einstein and Gödel’s theories, that time travel might, indeed, be possible. Whether in a century we’ll look back and laugh at the wild misguidedness of his proposition or at its blatant obviousness, only time will tell.

Gödel actually showed that if we were living in a rotating universe, this universe could create loops in time — and by “loops in time” I mean you actually have a timeline that’s normally a straight line of past, present, and future, that’s turned into a loop — and you can actually go along that loop in time and go back into the past. And he based his work squarely on Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

It’s Okay To Be Smart

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16 JULY, 2012

Designers on Top: MoMA’s Paola Antonelli on the Evolution of Design

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The quest for elegance and empowerment, or how design went from process to authorship.

In this wonderful talk from the 2012 EyeO Festival, playfully titled Designers on Top, MoMA Senior Curator of Architecture and Design Paola Antonelli offers a sweeping look at the evolution of design over the past few decades, and the past few years in particular, illustrated with examples from her most recent MoMA show, Talk to Me: Design and the Communication between People and Objects.

Beauty and elegance are a right, not a surplus… . We must demand, at least, intention.

Particularly insightful is this slide by Anthony Dunne, chair of the Interaction Design program at London’s Royal College of Art, and his partner, Fiona Raby, depicting the directional evolution of design from past to present.

For more, see the book based on Talk to Me, and follow Paola on Twitter for a steady stream of progressive design discernment.

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29 JUNE, 2012

The Scientific Cure for Hangovers

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Everything you (n)ever wanted to know about the aftermath of partying, and then some.

In the legal disclaimer of every Friday — especially Summer Fridays, with their earlier drinking start times and later bedtimes — should be a note about hangovers. But with science on your side, you might be able to short-circuit some of the gnarly side effects of excessive booze. From the fine Canadian folks at ASAP Science comes this scientific hangover cure — take notes:

And if you ever wondered what actually causes a hangover, they’ve got that down, too:

And while we’re at it, here’s the science of why coffee and alcohol make you pee:

For a deeper dive, see toxicologist Amitava Dasgupta’s indispensable tome, The Science of Drinking: How Alcohol Affects Your Body and Mind.

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